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JC Stinville

"Leveraging Plastic Delocalization in Metallic Materials to Access Extraordinary Fatigue Strength"

Event Details:

Thursday, November 16, 2023
4:30pm - 5:30pm PST

Location

Bldg. 530, Room 127

Abstract: To design high-performance structural metallic materials, a thorough comprehension of how their microstructure governs their macroscopic response and how they deform at the nanometer scale is essential. Thanks to recent advancements in electron microscopy technologies, automation, and computer science, high-resolution data can now be collected over representative microstructural regions during mechanical loading and analyzed rapidly. The associated statistical results demonstrate that the fatigue strength of metallic materials is controlled by the intensity of the localization of the plasticity at the nanometer scale, with materials displaying intense localization having poor fatigue strength and vice versa.   Here, we present an innovative approach to manipulating plastic localization during deformation by inducing mechanisms of plastic delocalization, which reduce the intensity of the localization during deformation. We use pre-deformation pathways in extreme conditions to generate initial plastic deformation states that trigger plastic delocalization mechanisms during further deformation, resulting in extraordinary improvement in fatigue strength.

Bio: Dr. Jean-Charles Stinville holds a Ph.D. in Solid Mechanics, Materials Science, and Mechanical Engineering and an aerospace engineering degree from French Grande Ecoles. In 2012, he joined the Materials Department at the University of California Santa Barbara and became a Research Specialist in 2015. As a Research Specialist, he has led efforts around the experimental development of in-situ characterization techniques for metallic materials deformation identification. He holds appointments in the Materials Science and Engineering Department and the Materials Research Laboratory as an assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His group designs sustainable and high-performance alloys for applications in extreme environments. In addition, they develop advanced experimental and numerical tools to tailor materials at the nano- to micrometer scales to improve their performances.

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